2020 - 2022 Federal Funding Awards

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TRPC Awards $8.6 million to Regional Transportation Priority Projects


Read the Press Release 

On July 6, Thurston Regional Planning Council (TRPC) awarded $8,604,853 federal transportation grant funding to 23 local transportation projects to be implemented between 2019 and 2022. The Council selected priority projects that will make the transportation system safer for all users, improve the efficiency of the transportation network, and repair or replace aging infrastructure.  

Select from the grant programs below to view the awards:

Click the titles to see project details.

2020-2022 Surface Transportation Program & Highway Improvement Program Grant Awards
APPLICANT PROJECT AWARD
Intercity Transit Pattison Street Facility Renovation and Expansion Project - Phase II
 $922,846
Intercity Transit Propane-Fueled Vans for Dial-A-Lift Service (3 vans) $368,490
Lacey College Street Corridor Improvements Phase 3
STP $318,853
HIP $586,327
Olympia Fones Road Project
 $1,176,803
Tenino Sussex Crossing Improvements II
 $60,009
Thurston County Yelm Highway and Meridian Intersection Project
 $1,300,000
Thurston County Thurston County Rural Mobility Strategy
 $300,000
Thurston County Case Road Fish Barrier Removal
 $500,000
Thurston County Yelm Hwy & Pacific Ave Pedestrian Improvements Phase 1
 $475,000
Thurston County Rochester-Grand Mound Trail Feasibility Study $150,000
Thurston County &
Intercity Transit
Martin Way Corridor Study - East  $193,250
Lacey Martin Way Corridor Study - East $86,500
Olympia Martin Way Corridor Study - West $173,000
TRPC Thurston County Bicycle Map 7th Ed  $38,925
Tumwater Old Hwy 99 / 79th Ave Roundabout
 $657,000
  TOTAL  $7,307,003
2020-2022 Federal Transportation Alternatives Program Grant Awards
APPLICANT PROPOSAL AWARD
Intercity Transit Walk N Roll for 2021/2022 and 2022/2023  $218,000
Olympia School
District & Olympia
School Speed Limit Zone Flashing Beacon Installation Project  $68,950
Schools School Walk Route Mapping for North Thurston, Olympia, & Tumwater Schools  $51,900
Tumwater Israel Rd & Linderson Way Pedestrian & Bicycle Improvements  $400,000
  TOTAL  $738,850
2020-2022 Federal Congestion Mitigation & Air Quality Improvement Program Grant Awards
APPLICANT PROPOSAL AWARD
Intercity Transit Propane-Fueled Vans for Dial-A-Lift Service (1 van) $122,830
Lacey & NTPS Electrifying the Thurston County I-5 Corridor $281,990
TRPC Taming the Dragons $154,180
  TOTAL  $559,000
  GRAND TOTAL AWARDED $8,604,853

STP Proposal Descriptions

Pattison Street Facility Renovation and Expansion Project

 Agency: Intercity Transit
 Grant Request: $922,846
 Match: $144,028
 Total Cost: $1,066,874
 Phase: Construction
 Project Date: 2020
 Location: Pattison Street, Olympia

Project Overview

Intercity Transit's Maintenance, Operations and Administrative (MOA) facility opened for service in 1985.  It was designed to support 80 vehicles and today supports the maintenance and operation of over 400. Space constraints necessitate the facility operate 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.  IT operations, maintenance, administrative staff, as well as approximately 700 volunteer vanpool drivers, park, fuel and ready vehicles for service day and night in this far too constrained space. 

This project will renovate existing facilities and expand the operation enabling Intercity Transit to better support existing services as well as address the growing needs of our communities.  It will preserve our current investment in the Pattison Street MOA facility as well as enhance the safety and the efficiency of service delivery.

Link to the full project application


Propane-Fueled Vans for Dial-A-Lift Service

Agency: Intercity Transit Grant Request: $709,000
Match: $143,000 Total Cost: $852,000
Phase: Vehicle Purchase Project Date: 2021-2023
Location: Dial-a-Lift Service Area

Project Overview


Dial-a-Lift (DAL) provides door-to-door transportation service for customers whose disabilities prevent them from using fixed-route service. DAL is a federally mandated (unfunded) requirement to provide ADA comparable paratransit service within a quarter mile of fixed-route service. The elimination, then severe reduction in federal funding has had a significant negative impact on our ability to fund replacement vehicles.

This project will replace 6 diesel-powered vehicles that are beyond their useful life with 6 propane-powered vehicles which will reduce PM10 emissions (diesel vs. propane) and result in a reduction of 1,285,134 pounds of carbon monoxide. Exceptional maintenance, conservative financial practices, and few grant options result in IT retaining DAL vehicles beyond their federal 7-year life-cycle and keeping them for no less than 10 years. IT provided 166,213 trips in 2016 and 170,714 in 2017. DAL has increased 21% over the last 10 years and is anticipated to grow even faster in the coming years based on age and population statistics. Funding these replacement vehicles will ensure we can continue services and do so while improving air quality in the region’s air quality maintenance area.

Link to the full project application


College Street Corridor Improvements Phase 3

 Agency: Lacey
 Grant Request: $905,180
 Match: $141,270
 Total Cost: $1,046,450
 Phase: Design and Engineering
 Project Date: 2020-2022
 Location: College St SE from 18th Ave to Lacey Blvd

Project Overview

This project will complete the design to improve College Street from 18th Avenue SE to Lacey Boulevard SE per the College St Corridor Plan. This project is the third phase of a multi-phased project on the College Street corridor to enhance multi-modal access, reduce speed, provide enhanced pedestrian accessibility and improve overall safety.
College Street is the busiest corridor within the City of Lacey with many residential neighborhoods directly adjacent to the corridor. The corridor leads directly to commercial districts and activity centers. College Street also lacks access management that causes a significant amount of conflicts. This project will reduce the conflict points with a raised median, and slow down vehicular traffic with a roundabout, allowing pedestrians and bicyclists to safely utilize College Street to get to homes, businesses and schools.

Link to the full project application


Fones Road Project


 Agency: Olympia
 Grant Request: $1,176,803
 Match: $368,490
 Total Cost: $1,361,700
 Phase: Design and Engineering
 Project Date: 2020-2022
 Location: Fones Road, 18th Avenue to Pacific Avenue


Project Overview

Fones Road is a major north/south connection between downtown Olympia, the I-5 corridor, southeast Olympia and Lacey. The City of Olympia envisions a multi-modal corridor along Fones Road. A predesign study is under way to define the specific scope of improvement to this street. Improvements are needed to address:
  • Vehicle capacity: the current level of service (LOS) E is unacceptable and is projected to be LOS F within the next six years.
  • Truck access to industrial sites.
  • Access management along the length of the corridor to reduce the potential for collisions.
  • Safe and inviting bicycle facilities, to help people access the Olympia Woodland Trail at the north end of the corridor.
  • Safe and inviting pedestrian facilities including sidewalks, pedestrian crossings, and landscaping along the street.

Link to the full project application


Sussex Crossing Improvements II

 Agency: Tenino
 Grant Request: $60,009
 Match: $9,366
 Total Cost: $69,375
 Phase: Design and Construction
 Project Date: 2020-2022
 Location: Sussex Ave and Hodgden

Project Overview

In Tenino, Sussex Avenue is the community's main street and doubles as State Route 507, a highway of statewide significance that is important for both vehicular travel and freight mobility through the region. However, there are issues with safety, mobility, and access for pedestrians crossing the highway. A similar 2016 STP Grant saw the installation of High Visibility Crossing devices at the busiest pedestrian intersection (Sussex and Custer), and on one-half of the corners at the second busiest intersection (Sussex and Ritter). With this grant cycle, we would like to protect all four corners of the third busiest intersection (Sussex and Hodgden.) "Busiest," as used here, means by pedestrians ... Both Custer and Ritter are used by elementary, junior, and high-school students, while Hodgden is used predominantly by customers of the Post Office, City Hall, the Fire District, and the commercial enterprises on both sides of Sussex Avenue, but also by students as well. The anticipated benefits of this proposal include: 1) increasing safety for pedestrians, cyclists, and drivers alike, and 2) improving safety along State Route 507 where it functions as Tenino's Main Street.

Link to the full project application

Yelm Highway and Meridian Intersection Project

 Agency: Thurston County
 Grant Request: $1,300,000
 Match: $700,000
 Total Cost: $2,000,000
 Phase: Construction
 Project Date: 2020-2022
 Location: Yelm Hwy and Meridian Rd Intersection

Project Overview

This project is needed to improve the safety and mobility for the Yelm Hwy and Meridian Rd intersection.  This intersection has the 4th highest crash rate of all 712 public road intersections in Thurston County.  Over 30% of the collisions are injury collisions and 65% of them are angle collisions.  Current operations do not meet current rural adopted Level of Service requirements (part urban/rural intersection). This project will construct a single lane roundabout which is the preferred alternative. This project is also included in the Thurston County Traffic Impact Study as a capacity project.  Other project benefits include reduced speeds and access control near the intersection, improved pedestrian crossings and widened paved shoulders.

This request is for construction funds only.

* Note: This proposal was revised on 5/18/2018 to include information about roundabout construction in the project description.

Link to the full project application

Thurston County Rural Mobility Strategy

 Agency: Thurston County
 Grant Request: $300,000
 Match: $50,000
 Total Cost: $350,000
 Phase: Study
 Project Date: 2020-2022
 Location: Throughout Thurston County

Project Overview

Many of the arterials in Thurston County connecting urban areas to rural communities are congested today, and growth projections show congestion will increase in the future. There are limitations, however, to addressing the congestion through road widening, including funding, environmental concerns, and physical (right-of-way) limitations. Like their urban counterparts – Strategy Corridors – these critical corridors need strategies other than road widening to address congestion.This study will evaluate different strategies, and make recommendations for implementation.

Link to the full project application


Case Road Fish Barrier Removal

Agency: Thurston County Grant Request: $500,000
Match: $250,000  Total Cost: $750,000 
Phase: Construction  Project Date: 2020-2022 
Location: Case Road, milepost 4.91

Project Overview

This project will replace a culvert structure where a tributary of Beaver Creek crosses Case Road.  The existing culvert is a partial fish passage barrier, and is located approximately 250 feet downstream of another partial barrier crossing under Interstate 5.  The I-5 crossing is one of WSDOT's uncorrected barriers subject to injunction.  The County's Fish Passage Enhancement Program has ranked the Case Road culvert among the highest priority culverts in part due to the proximity to the WSDOT injunction culvert.

The removal of both the Case Road culvert (this project) and the WSDOT culvert will allow access to over half a mile of habitat. 
  
This request is for construction funds only.

Link to the full project application

Yelm Hwy and Pacific Ave Pedestrian Improvements Phase 1

 Agency: Thurston County
 Grant Request: $475,000
 Match: $100,000
 Total Cost: $575,000
 Phase: Design and Construction
 Project Date: 2020-2022
 Location: Yelm Hwy SE and Pacific Ave SE

Project Overview

This request is for the design and construction of Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and crosswalk improvements for the Yelm Hwy (Rich Rd to Lacey City Limits) and Pacific Ave (City Limits to Steilacoom Rd) corridors.  Both corridors have high vehicle speeds and traffic volumes. Crosswalks only exist at signalized intersections within the corridor limits which creates long distances without marked crossings.  ADA facilities updates (e.g., curb ramps) will be also be included as part of the of this project.   It is not anticipated this project will complete all the ADA upgrades on both corridors but will provide design plans necessary to complete them later.  A study was recently completed to identify improvements within these corridors.  The study included stakeholder workshops, as well as public outreach.

Link to the full project application

Rochester-Grand Mound Trail Feasibility Study

Agency: Thurston County Grant Request: $150,000
Match: $25,000 Total Cost: $175,000
Phase: Study Project Date: 2020-2022
Location: Grand Mound to Rochester Corridor

Project Overview

Nonmotorized transportation facilities and safe routes to school are sorely lacking in this rural County Corridor. Although school bus transportation service is provided, community members including the Thurston County Fire District #1 Fire Chief and PSAP Railroad operators have all expressed concerns over the risks that vehicular travel and trains poses to school children and other pedestrians and cyclists in the unincorporated communities of southwest Thurston County.

The Rochester-Grand Mound Trail was identified in the 2007 Regional Trails Plan as an important east-west non-motorized corridor that connects people from the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation, and the communities of Rochester and Grand Mound. Expanding the trail corridor to these unserved communities will increase transportation and recreation opportunities for thousands of additional residents.
  
A feasibility study examining potential trail connections to these locations will lay the ground work for the future creation of the Rochester-Grand Mound Trail and is the next step outlined in the 2007 Regional Trails Plan.  The anticipated benefits of this proposal will identify future projects that will: 1) increase safety for cyclists, pedestrians, and drivers alike; and 2) provide a safe route to schools, increase recreational opportunities and provide for increasing physical activity.

Link to the full project application


Martin Way Corridor Study - East

 Agency: Thurston County and Intercity Transit
 Grant Request: $193,250
 Match: $30,160
 Total Cost: $223,410
 Phase: Study
 Project Date: 2020-2022
 Location: Martin Way Corridor between College and Marvin

Project Overview

Martin Way, from College Street to Marvin Road (4.1 miles), has been identified as both an urban corridor (land use designation) and strategy corridor (transportation designation) in regional and local plans. This former state highway serves as an alternative to I-5, has frequent transit service, and is a prime candidate for increasing land use intensity and walking and biking activity. This section of Martin Way carries between 17,000 to 31,000 daily vehicles, has bicycle lanes and sidewalks for the most part, but the multimodal infrastructure, such as safe opportunities to cross the roadway, is insufficient for an urban corridor. The Martin Way Corridor Study East will focus on this section of the corridor, and identify opportunities to increase multimodal mobility and safety. The project will be a collaborative project between Thurston County, Intercity Transit, the City of Lacey, and Thurston Regional Planning Council, with the City of Olympia and the Economic Development District as key partners. Note: If the Martin Way Corridor West project is also funded, the two projects will be conducted together.

Link to the full project application

Martin Way Corridor Study – East

Agency: Lacey Grant Request: $86,500
Match: $13,500 Total Cost: $100,000
Phase: Study Project Date: 2020-2022
Location: Martin Way, from College Street to Marvin Road

Project Overview

Martin Way, from College Street to Marvin Road (4.1 miles), has been identified as both an urban corridor (land use designation) and strategy corridor (transportation designation) in regional and local plans. This former state highway serves as an alternative to I‐5, has frequent transit service, and is a prime candidate for increasing land use intensity and walking and biking activity. This section of Martin Way carries between 17,000 to 31,000 daily vehicles, has bicycle lanes and sidewalks for the most part, but the multimodal infrastructure, such as safe opportunities to cross the roadway, is insufficient for an urban corridor. The Martin Way Corridor Study East will focus on this section of the corridor, and identify opportunities to increase multimodal mobility and safety. The project will be a collaborative project between Thurston County, the City of Lacey, Intercity Transit, and Thurston Regional Planning Council, with the City of Olympia, and the Economic Development District as key partners. Note: If the Martin Way Corridor West project is also funded, the two projects will be conducted together.

Link to the full project application


Martin Way Corridor Study – West

Agency: Olympia Grant Request: $173,000
Match: $27,000 Total Cost: $200,000
Phase: Study Project Date: 2020-2022
Location: Martin Way, from Pacific Avenue to College Street

Project Overview

Martin Way, from Pacific Avenue to College Street (3.2 miles), has been identified as both an urban corridor (land use designation) and strategy corridor (transportation designation) in regional and local plans. This former state highway serves as an alternative to I-5, has frequent transit service, and is a prime candidate for increasing land use intensity, and walking and biking activity. This section of Martin Way carries between 14,000 to 25,000 daily vehicles, and has bicycle lanes, but inconsistent pedestrian facilities. The Martin Way Corridor Study West will focus on this section of the corridor, and identify opportunities to increase multimodal mobility and safety. This is a collaborative project between the City of Olympia and Thurston Regional Planning Council, with Thurston County, the City of Lacey, Intercity Transit, and the Economic Development District as key partners. Note: If the Martin Way Corridor East project is also funded, the two projects will be conducted together.

Link to the full project application


Thurston County Bicycle Map 7th Ed

 Agency: TRPC
 Grant Request: $38,925
 Match: $6,075
 Total Cost: $45,000
 Phase: Program
 Project Date: 2020-2022
 Location: Countywide

Project Overview

This project will update the Thurston County Bicycle Map and offer both print and electronic versions to the public. The map is updated every two to three years to provide up-to-date information on new roads, bicycle facilities, trail segments, neighborhood connections, and the narrative sidebar information. Updating the map and distributing it in both print and electronic formats educates and reinforces safe bicycle behavior and promotes cycling as an effective means of transportation. In addition to showing bicycle routes to aid navigation, the map includes safety information, bicycle traffic laws, commuter tips, health messages, and information about bike clubs and shops. Since 1999, TRPC, Intercity Transit, Thurston County, the cities and other partners have collaborated, produced, and distributed five high quality editions of this map to people both within and outside of the Thurston County region free of charge. An update of the Bicycle Map is currently underway. This proposal is to update the subsequent edition (7th) of the Bicycle Map.

Link to the full project application

Old Hwy 99 / 79th Ave Roundabout

 Agency: Tumwater
 Grant Request: $657,000
 Match: $1,843,000
 Total Cost: $2,500,000
 Phase: Design and Right-of-Way
 Project Date: 2020-2022
 Location: Old Highway 99 and 79th Avenue intersection

Project Overview

Old Highway 99 is a Minor Arterial serving Principal Arterial function in terms of degree of mobility and is approaching the same in terms of traffic volume. As more jobs are created in Tumwater and residential development south of Henderson Blvd continues, the Old Highway 99 Corridor is becoming congested. At present, a single left turning vehicle can cause instantaneous backups exceeding 1/4 –mile during PM peak. 79th Avenue serves significant, and growing, residential and industrial uses and includes a skewed intersection connection to Old Highway 99. The City’s transportation plan identifies this intersection for needed improvements. This project includes preliminary engineering, design, right of way acquisition and construction of a one or two-lane roundabout as determined through modeling. It will, in short term, facilitate rectifying an intersection LOS deficiency (LOS F) for the minor approach and in long term serve as the launching point for future urbanized corridor improvements, to include provisions for non-motorized capacity and safety elements.

Link to the full project application

TAP Proposal Descriptions


Walk N Roll for 2021/2022 and 2022/2023

Agency: Intercity Transit Grant Request: $218,000
Match: $34,023 Total Cost: $252,023
Phase: Program Project Date: 2021-2023
Location: Various North Thurston, Olympia, and Tumwater School District schools

Project Overview

The Walk N Roll program is the cornerstone of Intercity Transit's Youth Education program that reduces drive‐alone trips to school and builds the next generation of safe and healthy pedestrians, bike riders, and transit users.

Many students may not learn about transportation options in school, at home, or in their community. Walk N Roll seeks to change that by showing young people the many options that exist to successfully get around by walking, biking, and using transit. Walk N Roll seeks and succeeds in showing students that active transportation can be easy, accessible for everyone, and fun.

This established, school‐focused public education and outreach program helps students and families to access their schools and community through active transportation choices, and positively influences air quality in our region, neighborhoods, and around public schools by reducing congestion and idling on the trip to school and home.

Link to the full project application


School Speed Limit Zone Flashing Beacon Installation Project

Agency: Olympia School District Grant Request: $68,950
Match: $11,550 Total Cost: $80,500
Phase: Design and Construction Project Date: 2020-2022
Location: Boulevard Road SE

Project Overview

This project will improve the school crossing on Boulevard Road SE at 15th Avenue SE and McKinley Place SE near the Olympia Regional Learning Academy, a K-12 school serving 400 students. The existing 20 MPH school speed limit zone signing, currently "When Flagged" or "When Children are Present," will be replaced. This project will include installation of School Speed Limit Zone flashing beacons and signing on Boulevard Road. Solar powered units will be installed, if feasible, or power will be installed. The intent of this traffic-control device is to more effectively get motorists' attention, informing them of when the school zone speed limit is in effect. Improved motorist compliance to the school zone speed limit will enhance the safety of students walking and bicycling to and from school and crossing at these locations, and encourage students to walk and bike to school rather than being driven to school.

Link to the full project application


School Walk Route Mapping for North Thurston, Olympia, and Tumwater Schools

Agency: Schools Grant Request: $51,900
Match: $8,100 Total Cost: $60,000
Phase: Program Project Date:  2020-2022
Location: North Thurston, Olympia, and Tumwater School Districts

Project Overview

Washington requires school districts to identify walking routes from each neighborhood to each elementary school (RCW 28A.160.160(5)) and review routes every two years. While school districts are fulfilling this basic requirement, the district maps are not family friendly or readily accessible to households seeking information for planning safe routes to school. School route maps are useful for encouraging students and families to walk or ride bikes to school safely and reduce the number of vehicles driving to and from schools. Such maps also play a role in assisting districts, their families, cities, and the county with identifying school transportation needs such as filling in sidewalk gaps, installing street crossing improvements, and school bus route planning.

TRPC and Intercity Transit in partnership through the Walk N' Roll Program will create detailed school walk route maps using an interdisciplinary stakeholder process. There are 31 elementary schools in North Thurston, Olympia, and Tumwater school districts. This project will formalize a partnership between the school districts, TRPC, Intercity Transit, and community stakeholders to develop effective and user-friendly school walk route maps for every elementary and several middle schools within the three districts. The maps will be reviewed and updated every two years, as necessary.

Link to the full project application


Israel Rd and Linderson Way Pedestrian and Bicycle Improvements

Agency: Tumwater Grant Request: $400,000
Match: $95,000 Total Cost: $495,000
Phase: Construction Project Date: 2020-2022
Location: Israel Rd and Linderson Way (near City Hall)

Project Overview

This project focuses on multi-modal improvements on portions of Israel Rd and Linderson Way. This proposal includes: replacement of select existing curb ramps, 4’ sidewalks and busted up steep driveways, addition of enhanced pedestrian crossing treatments (retroreflective markings and signs), installation of a new pedestrian refuge island, lane narrowing or road widening to accommodate bike lanes to an intersection, signal modifications such as addition of accessible pedestrian signals, pedestrian countdown signal heads and video detection so bikes are detected and more.

Link to the full project application


CMAQ Proposal Descriptions


Propane-Fueled Vans for Dial-A-Lift Service

Agency: Intercity Transit Grant Request: $709,000
Match: $143,000 Total Cost: $852,000
Phase: Vehicle Purchase Project Date: 2021-2023
Location: Dial-a-Lift Service Area

Project Overview


Dial-a-Lift (DAL) provides door-to-door transportation service for customers whose disabilities prevent them from using fixed-route service. DAL is a federally mandated (unfunded) requirement to provide ADA comparable paratransit service within a quarter mile of fixed-route service. The elimination, then severe reduction in federal funding has had a significant negative impact on our ability to fund replacement vehicles.

This project will replace 6 diesel-powered vehicles that are beyond their useful life with 6 propane-powered vehicles which will reduce PM10 emissions (diesel vs. propane) and result in a reduction of 1,285,134 pounds of carbon monoxide. Exceptional maintenance, conservative financial practices, and few grant options result in IT retaining DAL vehicles beyond their federal 7-year life-cycle and keeping them for no less than 10 years. IT provided 166,213 trips in 2016 and 170,714 in 2017. DAL has increased 21% over the last 10 years and is anticipated to grow even faster in the coming years based on age and population statistics. Funding these replacement vehicles will ensure we can continue services and do so while improving air quality in the region’s air quality maintenance area.

Link to the full project application


Electrifying the Thurston County I-5 Corridor

Agency: Lacey and North Thurston Public Schools Grant Request: $281,990
Match: $44,010 Total Cost: $326,000
Phase: Design and Construction Project Date: 2021-2023
Location: Intercity Transit Dial-A-Lift Service Area

Project Overview

In the coming years, residents will see an increase of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) on the roads, as well as PEV charging stations and other infrastructure at public and private facilities around the state. Using electricity for transportation fuel is a chance to increase the effectiveness of our energy system, reduce the use of fossil fuels, spur new technology, and reduce our carbon footprint. For information on the use of electric vehicles, see the Electric Drive WA website, a portal to information about electric vehicles in Washington State created by the Electric Vehicle Task Force.

Link to the full project application


Taming the Dragons

Agency: TRPC Grant Request: $129,750 - $216,250
Match: $33,750 Total Cost: $250,000
Phase: Program Project Date: 2021-2023
Location: State Capitol Campus

Project Overview

Despite decades of successful mobile/flexible work deployment nationwide, and several Executive Orders, Washington state agencies lag far behind in implementation. Management continues to focus on the negative: “How will I manage people I can’t see?”

Home to over 6,000 employees and headquarters of most state agencies, the Capital Campus (CC) impacts congestion on city streets and state highways. This intense outreach/education effort will target mobile/flexible work and am/pm schedule shifts. The program will focus on one‐on‐one and group interaction with top/mid‐level managers (deputy directors and their direct reports), taming the fears, and implementing robust formal programs that provide clear guidance to employees.

The Bottom Line on Telework, a 2013 Thurston region study estimated that telework among state and local government employees could reduce CO2 by 2,600‐12,800 metric tons a year (1 day/week to 3 days/week) – the greenhouse gas equivalent of planting 66,000‐328,000 trees. We anticipate proportional results for this subset.

Link to the full project application